Lecture Series 05 – September-November 2017

Hi, Restless Spirits!

This is our programs for September to November 2017. The topics are selected based on the open discussion by our librarian member in order to distribute the knowledge from the books in our library and also to share our individual interest. Here are the ingredients:

 

1. Designing With Bamboo: Course And Workshop, 30 September 2017

One day designing with bamboo course and workshop with Mukodas Syuhada and team.

In this course, tutors will explain characteristic of bamboo for building, and how to design with bamboo from the book written by Jules Janssen that is entitled “Building with Bamboo” and the book written by Heinz Frick that is entitled “Ilmu Konstruksi Bangunan Bambu”. These two books will be the introduction of the course. The second presentation is about the performance, the details, and the joint of the bamboo building from the book written by Andry Widyowijatnoko that is entitled “Traditional and Innovative Joints in Bamboo Construction”. This session followed with a workshop of detail design scheme by participants for 2.5 hours. The tutors will share his practice and experiment about designing with bamboo. The session followed by a workshop for interpreting Simon Velez and adapt its operation into the design.

 

2. Architectural Photography: Course And Workshop, 14 October 2017

One day photography class and workshop with Eric Dinardi and Team.

In this course, the participant will learn tips and techniques while exploring architectural objects with an architecture’s photographer. The session includes photo assignments in the field, talks on technique, and edit-and-critique sessions.

 

3. Learning From The Master: Renzo Piano, 21 October 2017

Discussion on Renzo Piano’s approaches, techniques, projects, life and career as an architect.

Throughout his career, Piano has sought an architecture free of myths, save for the myth of primordial making; that is to say, the inborn, world-creating drive of the homo faber, which in Piano’s case has a peculiar significance, due to the maritime craft culture of the Mediterranean from which his family stems. The anti-academicism that is such a profound aspect of his character is pre-Renaissance in its fundamental spirit, which surely accounts for certain conflicting aspects of his professional career: on the one hand, his debt to Baconian empirical science, that is, to the Anglo-Saxon pragmatic tradition: on the other, his respect for Italian craft production, for il mestiere, the mastery that may be acquired only through apprenticeship.

 

4. Architecture Pilgrimage Trip: Tan Tjiang Ay Works, 22 October 2017

One day walking through the scenic route, to explore, learn, and discuss the selected work of Tan Tjiang Ay in Jakarta.

(to be confirmed)

 

5. Designing The Livable Cities: Course And Workshop, 28 October 2017

One day urban design course and workshop by Ardzuna Sinaga and Team.

In this course, tutors will explain basic principles of urban design, and how to design a livable city through several major approaches in urban design. The second presentation will talk about the urban phenomenon through the perspective of food chain, taken from the book entitled Hungry City that was written by Carolyn Steel. This session will be followed by a workshop of detail design scheme by participants for 2.5 hours. The tutors will share his practice and experiment about designing with bamboo. The session followed by a workshop for interpreting Simon Velez and adapt its operation into the design.

 

6. Horror And Its Architectural Analogues, 29 October 2017

Discussion on the book written by Joshua Comaroff and Ong Ker-Shing  “Horror in Architecture”.

Every designer desires to create something exceptional, something that will surprise the viewer and set the creation apart from the rest (who would go out of their way to design something banal or mundane?). However, the deviant anatomies that result from this architectural thrill-seeking can be dangerous, and, if we’re not careful, could evolve into a new archi-monster. Joshua Comaroff and Ong Ker-Shing’s book “Horror in Architecture” begins to inspect some of these fearful creations. In these, normal compositions become strange: extra limbs appear, holes open where they should not, individual objects are doubled or split or perversely occupied. Horrifying buildings re-imagine the possibilities of architectural language, shifting from “natural” norms to other, more rarified and exciting options. They define an expanded aesthetic field that marries the beautiful to the distorted, the awkward, the manifold, and the indeterminate. Through an investigation that spans architecture, art, and literature, this study attempts to limn horror through its shifting forms and meanings – and to identify a creeping unease that lingers at the very centre of the modern project.

 

7. Studies In Tectonic Culture, 4 November 2017

Discussion based on the book written by Kenneth Frampton “Studies In Tectonic Culture”.

In ten essays and epilogue, Kenneth Frampton traces the history of contemporary from as an evolving poetic of structure and construction. The book’s analytical rests on Frampton’s close readings of key French, German, and English sources from the eighteenth century to the present. He clarifies the various turns that structural engineering and tectonic imagination have taken in the works of such architects as Perret, Wright, Kahn, Scarpa, and Mies, showing how for them both constructional form and material character were integral to an evolving architectural expression. Frampton also demonstrates that the way in which these elements are articulated from one work to the next provides a basis upon which to evaluate the works as a whole. This is especially evident in his consideration of the work of Perret, Mies, and Kahn and the continuities in their thoughts and attitudes that linked them to the past. Frampton considers the conscious cultivation of the tectonic tradition in architecture as an essential element in the future development of architectural form, casting a critical new light on the entire issue of modernity and on the place of much work that has passed as “avant-garde.”

 

8. Architecture Without Architect, 18 November 2017

Discussion based on the book written by Bernard Rudofsky “architecture without architect”.

Bernard Rudofsky defined discipline that has governed our sense of architectural history and discusses the art of building as a universal phenomenon. He introduces communal architecture. Architecture produced not by specialists but by the spontaneous and continuing activity of a whole people with a common heritage, acting within a community experience. The beauty of “primitive” architecture has often been dismissed as accidental, but today we recognize it an art form that has resulted from human intelligence applied to uniquely human modes of life. Indeed, he sees the philosophy and practical knowledge of the untutored builders as untapped sources of inspiration for the industrial man trapped in his chaotic cities. He peels the pretence of architecture from the creative and utilitarian acts of building to reveal a kind of vernacular, communal architecture embodying a timeless art form that springs from the intersection of human intelligence, necessity, and collective creativity. Bernard Rudofsky defined discipline that has governed our sense of architectural history and discusses the art of building as a universal phenomenon. He introduces communal architecture. Architecture produced not by specialists but by the spontaneous and continuing activity of a whole people with a common heritage, acting within a community experience. The beauty of “primitive” architecture has often been dismissed as accidental, but today we recognize it an art form that has resulted from human intelligence applied to uniquely human modes of life. Indeed, he sees the philosophy and practical knowledge of the untutored builders as untapped sources of inspiration for the industrial man trapped in his chaotic cities. He peels the pretence of architecture from the creative and utilitarian acts of building to reveal a kind of vernacular, communal architecture embodying a timeless art form that springs from the intersection of human intelligence, necessity, and collective creativity.

“I believe that sensory pleasure should take precedence over intellectual pleasure in art and architecture.”  Bernard Rudofsky

 

9. Mathematics Of Architecture, 25 November 2017

Discussion based on the book written by Jane Burry and Mark Burry entitled The New Mathematics Of Architecture.

In the era of digital design and manufacturing, architecture can experiment with and apply the mathematical concept to built structures as never before. This in-depth survey of forty-six international projects, compiled and written by leading architects of digital design, offers a thorough overview of the most exciting manifestations of these new processes through accessible illustrations, lucid texts, hands-on experience and constructed projects. The result is a rich compendium of the thinking and building behind today’s most exciting architecture.

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